Wenger puts forward Unbeatable Argument against Quotas

A day to go before the Middlesbrough-Riverside match, and Wenger’s gone on another one-man-against-the-world tirade. My favourite kind…

The Arsenal manager has pleaded with the English FA to not go foreign once more, with regards to appointing a new national coach. “No Special One” is the order of the day; Wenger insists that the touted (pouted) Jose Mourinho is not the answer to England’s woes and that only an Englishman would have the team’s concerns at heart.

In isolation, the argument has its moments, but nothing more. You need look no further to see the magic that Guus Hiddink weaved with South Korea, Australia and now Russia to see that a good coach is a good coach.

However, it’s only a small part of Wenger’s argument of a greater scope, which attacks the proposed quotas a lot of desperate right wingers want to inflict upon the most marketable and arguably best league in the world.

In a scathing attack against a pointless, no-result, obsolete and racist quota-proposal, Wenger has drawn on his experiences in France (where he already had to battle with the corrupt FFA who had Marseilles’ interests – and their interests alone – at heart) which forced compulsory inclusions of status-players, whether they merited the position or not. Wenger says:

I was at the centre of an experience [in France] where we had to play three players in the squad who were under 21. You know what these people became? Professional bench players.

Every week they sat next to the manager, not only did more French players not play but they did not even play in the reserves or practice enough, and in the end we cut the rule and we opened it up completely again because what happens is you produce professional substitutes.

The statistic being bandied about at the moment goes along the lines of “71 per cent of players in the league were English in 1992-93, and now it’s closer to 38 per cent.” To whoever posits that, get a clue. That was just after the Heysel and Hillsborough disasters that excluded English clubs from European competition until they got their stadiums sorted. What European player would have wanted to ply their trade in such an isolated environment? Not many.

The quota system would signal the end of the Premier League. The pathetic excuses for leagues known as the Bundesliga and the Serie-A would rise above England’s, and Spain – as sterile as their league may be – will be unanimously crowned the best league in the world.

It would signal the end for both the quality of play involved, as well as the fact it would greatly disenfranchise the overwhelming majority of people that enjoy the Premier League – ‘plastic foreigners’, like myself. Like many of Third-Gen’s readers. Like many of any damn blog’s readers.

Yes, the English league is and English institution. But the Premier League – the breakaway league that brought in money for clubs to buy the best there was – Paul Ince or Roy Keane? Kiwomya or Kanu? Sutton or Benni McCarthy? – is an international product.

Time for the Little-Englander rubbish to stop. ‘Your league’ is the world’s league, now. You can argue for starting times not to be influenced by China, or American Footballers destroying Wembley’s pitch – but the only way England is ever going to compete as a team against the Germany’s, Croatia’s and Spain’s of this world is to do what they all did – focus on your grassroots, instead of the quick-fix Wenger-effigy solutions constantly spouted by Manchester United managers.

God, I love a good rant. If there were more English players like Theo Walcott, the team would already be twice as good. The young winger-cum-striker is working his socks off to get into Arsenal’s XI, instead of whinging about ‘how terrible Wenger is’. In an interview with the Telegraph, Walcott speaks of his admiration for Michael Owen, Liverpool and Arsene Wenger – the latter of which he gets nervous around out of sheer respect. Walcott has revealed that Wenger has given him personal advice on how to improve and become a fixture in Arsene’s team. Walcott says:

He said I needed to be more aggressive, not kicking people, but running at players, getting behind players, doing the stuff he bought me for. He put me in against Slavia Prague and the two goals helped. If I had played poorly, maybe I would be in his bad books. I put myself about that game.

Walcott, take some lessons from your fellow ‘English talent’, and commit a few more fouls anyway. You know, the ‘English spirit‘ and all that. Joe Cole and Marcus Bent – you are being watched. One man watching us, however, goes by the inconspicuous name of ‘Deco’, who says Arsenal is one of the teams he’ll be hoping to avoid in this year’s Champions League. To any Spurs fans with a lingering delusion of grandeur – teams like Barcelona would be salivating at beating your whipping boys. Just to drive that dagger in a little deeper (teach you lot to send me childish emails…).

Finally, Wenger has spoken out against Sam Allardyce who accused Arsenal of ‘blatantly diving’ – the focus surrounding Bacary Sagna’s penalty claim that even my Man Utd supporting uncle admits ‘was a close call’. Wenger says this is simply not true, and that the referee missed countless fouls against us while facing off with Newcastle.

Added to that, Manuel Almunia – the Sungod, how I love thee so – has reiterated how he would more than love to represent England one day, after he becomes eligible to play next year. Would be both a humouress and deserving thing to see – he has certainly performed better than either Robinson or David James this season, though it does remind you of how deserving Cudicini of Chelsea was of the same thing – and how stupid the FA were to overlook him.

Life, for you. Middlesbrough preview tomorrow – praise your respective gods, kiss your idols and walk under ladders to make sure of those three points. Fans have to perform so much work, you know. Salaam, until then.

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5 Comments

Filed under Arsenal, Blogging, English Premier League

5 responses to “Wenger puts forward Unbeatable Argument against Quotas

  1. Aminda

    Wenger is right. Mourinho said when he left chelsea that he wants a different country and a new language and that mean jose is not coming back for sure. Christi Simpson went to his home and asked him about the England job and mourinho said ” there’s nothing, it’s nothing”. This means that he does’nt want it and he could not answer a silly,stupid and inaccurate question like that. I support him if he finds a different experience. F.A must find a english manager like martin’o neil who is the perfect one or harry hedknapp the silent one. We fans must understand even under mourinho we cannot be dominent at the international level. It’s something we must keep in our mind

  2. enki

    The pathetic excuses for leagues known as the Bundesliga and the Serie-A would rise above England’s, and Spain – as sterile as their league may be – will be unanimously crowned the best league in the world.
    i was with you until you made this totally ridiculous statement. i will not defend searia a but the bundesliga is a competitive league which while dominated by bayern still throw up far more unexpected champions than the prem has. in fact when was the last time the prem threw up an enexpected champions? La liga is the most competitive league of the big three and while barca and real may rule they have not win the league on a canter for a long time. certainly not in the way that arsenal went a whole season undefeated and chelsea only lost once.Do you even watch spanish football. Because if you did you would have seen that even a relegation threathened team is likely to have a go at madrid or barca and beat them regularly. And the quality of football(as opposed to hoofball played by most prem team) is high even in team like mallorca and bilbao.

  3. jammathon

    While your point about the eventual champions of other leagues may stand, the point made about the lesser teams in La Liga is stretched. This is far more the case in England than Spain ever will be. Apart from home games against Derby, there is no such thing as an easy game in the English Premier League, while I think you will be hard pressed to make such claims about teams like Getafe or Bilbao. Real and Barca’s defeats against these teams have come through their own high-and-mightiness, rather than the quality of the opposition. i.e, the taking for granted of results. Just look at the points that these teams eventually gain in the table – not much, bar the genuine underdogs like Sevilla and Villareal.

    Compare that to Fulham, Man City and Reading’s path in the league over the last few seasons – the style of football in England, with the pace that no other league can match and hard tackling, mixed with the imported skills we’re all used to by now, just cannot be matched by the other leagues. How else do you explain 3 seasons in a row with English teams in the Champions League Final, and 3 teams out of four semi finalists last year?

  4. jammathon

    While your point about the eventual champions of other leagues may stand, the point made about the lesser teams in La Liga is stretched. This is far more the case in England than Spain ever will be. Apart from home games against Derby, there is no such thing as an easy game in the English Premier League, while I think you will be hard pressed to make such claims about teams like Getafe or Bilbao. Real and Barca’s defeats against these teams have come through their own high-and-mightiness, rather than the quality of the opposition. i.e, the taking for granted of results. Just look at the points that these teams eventually gain in the table – not much, bar the genuine underdogs like Sevilla and Villareal.

    Compare that to Fulham, Man City and Reading’s path in the league over the last few seasons – the style of football in England, with the pace that no other league can match and hard tackling, mixed with the imported skills we’re all used to by now, just cannot be matched by the other leagues. How else do you explain 3 seasons in a row with English teams in the Champions League Final, and 3 teams out of four semi finalists last year?

  5. Steve duK

    Re. Quotas

    I’ve watched my fair share of crap football over the years, having unwaveringly support the Arse since 1970 and I will support the club, whatever happens until I finally get carted off to the great North Bank in the sky.
    In saying that, I feel so honoured to watch the team these days, although I find it difficult watching other matches now, because I’ve been spoilt watching the boys and other games bore me. (Chavski being a prime example!!)
    Other teams and so-called experts are just jealous and are trying to even the balance with this quota malarkey.
    Any sane person can see that, far from improving the national team, it will destroy English football for good.
    The dickheads in the pro-quota corner however, are extremely delusional. I’m confident that even if it did come in, and I really hope it doesn’t, Arsene would pluck some unknown kids from his magic hat and before you know it, we’d be head and shoulders above the rest again.
    They should realise that the main ingredient for success is a great manager. It speaks for itself that every other team has raided the continent for players and paid ridiculous fees, yet Arsene always seems to get the cream for the price of milk.
    Even Avram Grunt is piping up now because his team currently contain a lot of English players. Does he think that will be the case forever – how short-sighted are this knob jockeys.

    Anyway – Rant Over
    Up The Arse